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I just supported Now is the #TimeToAct on @ThunderclapIt // @FCOHumanRights

Ask me a question
The true novelist, poet, musician, or artist is really a discoverer.

One Man can make a Difference is what we are discussing on Radio Campus Station 107.4, Peshawar University.
Host : Mehwish Ghani, Aamenaah and Shakeel Akhunzada.

After the slumber of the year
The woodland violets reappear;
All things revive in field or grove,
And sky and sea, but two, which move
And form all others, life and love.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, from “When Passion’s Trance is Overpast” (via the-final-sentence)

penguinteen:

Today we welcome Gordon Dahlquist to the Penguin Teen Author Spotlight! Gordon is the author of the deliciously weird and mysterious The Different Girl, which you should read. Need proof? The Horn Book said, “Veronika’s simple, sometimes profound first-person narration explores the nature of identity and what it means to be human in an oddly touching story of a future world.” Told you! Before you go out and grab your copy though, hang out here with Gordon for a few seconds!

Name: Gordon Dahlquist
Novel: The Different Girl
Available: February 21, 2013

Who’s your favorite author, living or dead? It might sound boring, but since I write plays as well as novels, I have to say Shakespeare.  There are so many different worlds within his plays, so much that’s laugh-out-loud funny and stick-in-your-throat sad, and each time I read or see one, I find something I didn’t catch before. 

What’s your favorite thing about your book? That so much of the reader’s experience turns on what they aren’t told, and what they can’t see.

If you could spend one year on a deserted island with one character from literature, who would you choose? Probably Scheherazade, the brilliant woman from the One Thousand and One Nights, who could fill the time spinning tale after amazing tale …

Where do you write? I write in coffee shops – specifically in two places near my apartment in Prospect Heights, in Brooklyn.  I much prefer writing outside of my apartment, and they make much better coffee than I do.

Who is your favorite hero or heroine of history? I once wrote a play about Diego Velázquez, the 17th century Spanish painter, who I think was an amazing person.  One of the greatest painters of all time, he was court painter to the same king for almost 40 years.  His paintings document the slow collapse of the Spanish empire, but at the same time depict his – doomed - subjects with compassion and clarity.  His work is a great lesson about how an artist can be unflinching and still human, and those paintings are amazing to this day.

Do you tweet? What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever tweeted? I don’t, though I look at a few twitter streams online every once in a while, like @TweenHobo who can be very funny.

What is your favorite season? It used to be fall, but in the last years it’s changed to summer – so much that I try to spend a few weeks every summer in Palm Springs, hoping that the temperature will get up to 120.

If you could teleport anywhere in the known universe right now, where would you go? Assuming I could teleport with a space-suit, I’d love to go to Io or Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, for a front-row, sky-filling view of the gas-giant planet, with its churning storm systems larger than all of earth.

Do you have any writing rituals? When I write I wear headphones that play loud music, mostly guitar-driven rock.  Since I usually write in coffee shops, the music becomes a wall of sound, keeping out the conversations around me and sinking my attention deeper into what I’m writing.  A lot of people find music – especially music with words – to be distracting, but once I get started I don’t even notice it anymore.

What is your idea of earthly happiness? Probably reading a good book with a cat on my lap.  Or hiking in a redwood forest.  Or swimming in blue water off a white sand beach.  Or all three at once, which probably wouldn’t thrill the cat …

What is the best concert you’ve ever been to? Probably the LA punk band X, who I saw when I lived in Portland, Oregon.  They were awesome, and their singer Exene Cervenka was wearing a dress made from potato sacks.

What are you currently working on? I’m finishing the first draft of a new YA novel, also science-fiction, called Second Skin.  It isn’t a sequel in any way to The Different Girl, but takes place in another part of that same world, and shows more fully some things that in the earlier book are only glimpsed.

……………………..


Thanks Gordon! We can’t WAIT to see what comes next, especially if it shows us even more of the world of The Different Girl!

Add The Different Girl to your “to-read” shelf on Goodreads!

Buy The Different Girl from Penguin, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books a Million, your local, independent bookstore, Powell’s, and Walmart!

shortformblog:

nationalpostphotos:

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher stands in a British tank during a visit to British forces in Fallingbostel, some 120km (70 miles) south of Hamburg, Germany. on Sept. 17, 1986. Thatchers former spokesman, Tim Bell, said that the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had died Monday morning, April 8, 2013, of a stroke. She was 87. (AP Photo/Jockel Fink)Click photo for more

The British leader, in her natural element.

shortformblog:

nationalpostphotos:

British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher stands in a British tank during a visit to British forces in Fallingbostel, some 120km (70 miles) south of Hamburg, Germany. on Sept. 17, 1986. Thatchers former spokesman, Tim Bell, said that the former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had died Monday morning, April 8, 2013, of a stroke. She was 87. (AP Photo/Jockel Fink)
Click photo for more

The British leader, in her natural element.

danmeth:

Go away, Mr. Monday! We don’t like you. 

danmeth:

Go away, Mr. Monday! 
We don’t like you. 

explore-blog:


In 1987, Ebert’s words of encouragement made a strong impression on me, a brainy fat kid who felt less comfortable in his skin than in the darkness of a movie theater. I didn’t grow up to be a movie critic (or a journalist or an actor). But in that year, I began to feel more confident in myself as a writer. I found my voice, and in time, felt less awkward in my body.

The letter Roger Ebert send a teenage boy who aspired to be a film critic. Also see Ebert’s advice on writing and life and how Alfred Hitchcock had similar impact on a boy’s life.

explore-blog:

In 1987, Ebert’s words of encouragement made a strong impression on me, a brainy fat kid who felt less comfortable in his skin than in the darkness of a movie theater. I didn’t grow up to be a movie critic (or a journalist or an actor). But in that year, I began to feel more confident in myself as a writer. I found my voice, and in time, felt less awkward in my body.

The letter Roger Ebert send a teenage boy who aspired to be a film critic. Also see Ebert’s advice on writing and life and how Alfred Hitchcock had similar impact on a boy’s life.

think-progress:

Pitiful, America.

think-progress:

Pitiful, America.